Daily_briefing_toon

Daily Briefing

Deep buzz for the content-deprived

Every weekday, while you get showered and dressed, we pluck these dewy- fresh, breaking stories from the info-clogged byways of the datasphere. Pour yourself a cup of coffee and stoke up on everything you need to know, or at least enough to fake it.

Fear Of A Black President
Ta-Nehisi Coates, The Atlantic | Fear Of A Black President | August 26, 2012

As a candidate, Barack Obama said we needed to reckon with race and with America's original sin, slavery. But as our first black president, he has avoided mention of race almosat entirely. In having to be "twice as good" and "half as black," Obama reveals the false promise and double standard of integration...

Obama's Campaign Is Depending On A Strong Ground Game Against Romney
T.W. Farnam and Dan Eggen, The Washington Post | Obama's Campaign Is Depending On A Strong Ground Game Against Romney | August 23, 2012

When President Obama campaigned in Las Vegas on Wednesday, his aides had laid the groundwork by opening 18 field offices around the city. Mitt Romney’s state operation has opened three.

In the critical battleground state, the Nevada Democratic Party has been building staff for two years and now has nearly 200 people organizing volunteers, knocking on doors, registering voters and compiling lists of supporters. Romney’s Nevada campaign is backed up by about 40 workers...

Inside Mitt Romney's Bain Files
Alex Klein, The Daily Beast | Inside Mitt Romney's Bain Files | August 23, 2012

In a massive document dump, Gawker has published 950 pages of confidential files related to Mitt Romney's finances. Alex Klein on what's notable in the cache -- and what to ignore...

Romney Unveils Plan For Energy Independence
Ashley Parker, The New York Times | Romney Unveils Plan For Energy Independence | August 23, 2012

Mitt Romney unveiled an energy plan Thursday that he said would make North America energy independent by 2020, at what would be the end of his second term as president.

His plan would allow states more control over the development of energy resources on federal lands within their borders, as well as aggressively expand offshore oil and gas drilling — including along the coasts of Virginia and the Carolinas — as part of a broader effort to reach energy independence...

In Toll Of 2,000, New Portrait Of Afghan War
James Dao and Andrew W. Lehren, The New York Times | In Toll Of 2,000, New Portrait Of Afghan War | August 22, 2012

His war was almost over. Or so Marina Buckley thought when her son Lance Cpl. Gregory T. Buckley Jr. told her that he would be returning from southern Afghanistan to his Marine Corps base in Hawaii in late August, three months early.

Instead, Lance Corporal Buckley became the 1,990th American service member to die in the war when, on Aug. 10, he and two other Marines were shot inside their base in Helmand Province by a man who appears to have been a member of the Afghan forces they were training...

Japanese Internment Camp Captured In Stunning Kodachrome Photographs

During World War II, the United States incarcerated thousands of Japanese Americans -- some for up to 4 years -- in remote camps without due process. Two-thirds of the 120,000 people who were sent to the camps were American citizens.

Months after the attack on Pearl Harbor, Bill Manbo of Riverside, CA, was sent to a camp in Wyoming with his family. Manbo, an amateur photographer, documented his time there in stunning Kodachrome pictures recently published in Colors of Confinement...

Richard Thompson Interview: Cul De Sac Ending
John Glynn, AMU | Richard Thompson Interview: Cul De Sac Ending | August 22, 2012

JG: Can you tell us a little about why you've decided to suspend Cul De Sac?

RT: I was diagnosed with early onset Parkinson's disease in the summer of 2009. At first it didn't affect my drawing, but that's gradually changed. Last winter I got an excellent cartoonist, Stacy Curtis, to ink my roughs, which was a great help. But now I've gotten too unreliable to produce a daily strip...

Laughs Were On Her, By Design
Richard Severo and Peter Keepnews, The New York Times | Laughs Were On Her, By Design | August 21, 2012

...Ms. Diller, who became famous for telling jokes that mocked her odd looks, her aversion to housekeeping and a husband she called Fang, was far from the first woman to do stand-up comedy. But she was one of the most influential. There were precious few women before her, if any, who could dispense one-liners with such machine-gun precision or overpower an audience with such an outrageous personality.

One chestnut: “I once wore a peekaboo blouse. People would peek and then they’d boo.”

Another: “I never made ‘Who’s Who,’ but I’m featured in ‘What’s That?’ ”

Ms. Diller, a 37-year-old homemaker when she took up comedy, mined her domestic life for material, assuring audiences that she fed Fang and her kids garbage soup and buried her ironing in the backyard...

The Irony Of The Anti-Immigration Violence in Assam
Dilip D'Souza | The Irony Of The Anti-Immigration Violence In Assam | August 21, 2012

The anti-immigrants violence in the Indian state of Assam and the Sikh shooting in Wisconsin both come from the hate of the other. But why do immigrants themselves hate that which they are or were? Dilip D'Souza on the irony of immigration...

 

Life With Syria's Rebels In A Cold And Cunning War
C.J. Chivers, The New York Times | Life With Syria's Rebels In A Cold And Cunning War | August 21, 2012

Abdul Hakim Yasin, the commander of a Syrian antigovernment fighting group, lurched his pickup truck to a stop inside the captured residential compound he uses as his guerrilla base.

His fighters had been waiting for orders for a predawn attack on an army checkpoint at the entrance to Aleppo, Syria’s largest city. The men had been issued ammunition and had said their prayers. Their truck bomb was almost prepared.

Now the commander had a surprise...