A clean, well-lit place to vent

Please feel free to contribute to this frequently-updated forum, which posts selected commentary on our favorite comic strip. If you’d like your critique to be posted, please note that civility, if not approbation, counts. Click here to submit a comment.

Melinda Capozza | Huntington, IN | November 30, 2015

Last week's Classic strips on the homeless during the Thanksgiving holiday were totally on target. Goodness knows people need to be reminded that there are so many in need, less fortunate than some of us. Thank you.

Paul Hawkins | Wooster, OH | November 29, 2015

Zonker and Zip part of the 1% ?! Damn I love the irony!

Scott Boye | Friday Harbor, WA | November 29, 2015

God, I've missed Toggle!

D.C. | Gloster, UK | November 29, 2015

Yay! The twins!

Neal | Concord, NH | November 24, 2015

"Well, I thought so, but I may have gotten it wrong." Today's 35-years-ago Flashback is definitely on my list of best Doonesbury strips ever! Honey truly is the real hero (if somewhat an anti-hero) of modern history. She's there at all the great moments, blithely, innocently shaking the world to its foundation. She's kind of like earth's R2-D2. 


Jeffrey Burr | New York, NY | November 23, 2015

It's so interesting that back in 1985 you could just say "the Depression" and everyone understood that you meant the 1930s. Nowadays you'd be more likely to feel the need to specify either "the Great Depression" or "the 1930s Depression" to refer to that one, in order to differentiate it from the one we just went through starting in 2007.

Suzie Null | Durango, CO | November 22, 2015

If the professor in today's strip had been female, Sam would have also been evaluating her on her appearance, clothing choices, "likeability," and on how often she smiled. Sam would have also evaluated her more harshly than a male professor if she hadn't been available, on call, to help Sam through everything from content, to advising, to personal issues, or to "accommodate" Sam if she hadn't been able or willing to do the course work.

P.H. | USA | November 21, 2015

There you have it! In the 45-years-ago-today Flashback strip we learn why B.D. always wore a helmet: His ears stick out. Mystery solved!

Donna C. | Lucerne, CA | November 20, 2015

I loved today's dance clip on the home page -- a great mashup of historic dancers and modern music. Thanks for the boogie feet to start the day! 

Stephanie Knopp | Philadelphia, PA | November 20, 2015

Bravo, Garry! Love this week's revisit of the J.J. art scene strips. As a veteran professor for many years in an art school, I can attest that you completely captured the nonsensical jargon that has proliferated throughout the art world. As always, you hit a bullseye.

Aging Zoo Animal | Silverton, CO | November 19, 2015

Poor Mike. At least we know that he will have a soft landing with his wise, kind, and understanding second wife, Kim. Even narcissistic J.J. will find her true soul mate in the worthless parasite, Zeke. God couldn't have found a better plan than Mr. Trudeau's.

John Bevan | Sydney, AUSTRALIA | November 18, 2015

I can't recall that the great artists of the past needed to append long, tedious, usually pointless explanations of their work. Even worse are those who need to cover their art with words! If it isn't clear what the work is about then there's no point in waffling on.

John Ghalt | Anchorage, AK | November 18, 2015

GBT has latched onto a seemingly essential aspect of Modern Art -- the need to explain it. Such a contrast with "pre-modern" art. Michaelangelo's David and a Rembrandt portrait need no explanation at all.

Lala Palooza | USA | November 17, 2015

I love doonesbury so much! I have been reading it since it began. It's like home to me. Thank you so much; i really mean that. You have saved me many times. Great website, too.

A. Nonymous | Not-NYC, USA | November 15, 2015

I'm afraid that the dating scene in NYC has not improved in the last 30 years. See, for instance, the work of NYC resident and artist, Ms. Connie Sun: here, here, and here.

John Brennand | Langley, CANADA | November 11, 2015

The video you have posted on your site today acknowledges what on your side of the 49th parallel is called Veterans Day, and which we call Remembrance Day. All over both of our countries politicians and dignitaries will stand before crowds to tell us how proud we are of those who put their lives on the line. We all bow our heads, observe two minutes of silence, then get on with our busy lives. Prior to World War I, veterans were simply ignored once their usefulness had ended. We then recognized that the sacrifices, whether in physical or mental injury, must be paid for in financial and medical supports. Somehow that commitment has been forgotten. This year, let's hope that words become actions and all our veterans are treated to the dignity and respect they have earned, with "blood, tears, and sweat."

C. Ruta | Napanee, CANADA | November 11, 2015

In light of Monday's SayWhat? quote from Canadian PM Justin Trudeau, explaining why his newly-formed cabinet is 50% female: "Because it's 2015," I felt a flutter of recognition when I read today's 40-years-ago Flashback strip. From Trudeau to Trudeau, four decades.

Chris | St. Augustine, FL | November 10, 2015

Re: MENTAL PROCESSES. We recently had the pleasure of seeing Eric Idle and John Cleese (together again for the very first time) and they discussed the beginnings of Monty Python. They said that finding the perfect punchline took as much time as writing the rest of the skit -- which is why they dispensed with it and simply had "the Colonel" or a giant foot or "Now for something completely different." It is hard work, and GBT excels at it.

Craig Baumberger | Greenville, IL | November 09, 2015

Thank you for today's video. An extraordinary gift of harmony so early in the morning.

Shooshie | Dallas, TX | November 09, 2015

In today's Classic strip Marcia says "Mr. Right would dress me with his eyes." One wonders what mental processes lead to such amazing punch lines, day after day, week after week, for forty-five years. That's a mighty deep well, Mr. Trudeau. And one that I greatly appreciate. These comics have been touchstones for my sanity for, well, 45 years of my life!