Faq_toon

FAQs

Beta-fresh answers, uploaded weekly

Lets face it, our favorite comic strip is often obscure or inconsistent, and key characters are sometimes left stranded for years. Long-suffering readers are within their rights to demand some clarification. Use the "Ask GBT" form to email us your questions, and we will frequently answer some of the best!

 

Recent FAQS

Q.

When I saw Duke's denunciation of John Denver in the recent Classic, it reminded me that there's always been bad blood there; it's come up more than once in the strip. Care to give us the backstory?

C.B. | Characters | Anderson, CA | July 03, 2014
A.

Certainly. The conflict has its origin in the mountains of Colorado. It was born in the summer of the strip's fifth year...

Q.

I can't help noticing that there was a certain air of foreshadowing in the strip back when Ray oversaw the handing over of Iraqi security concerns to the local military. With the announcement of US troops returning to take on certain levels of security in the country, could we please take a moment to return to that first day of Iraqi security (or lack thereof)? I seem to remember it was during the World Cup as well...

Schuyler | Storyline | Ames, IA | June 20, 2014
A.

The Ray Hightower sequence your excellent memory has referenced appeared in the summer of 2010, and was followed by a Mel-and-Roz-packing-up-the-helos series a year and a half later. You can read both HERE.

Q.

Speaking of Time magazine (in today's Daily Briefing), it looks like you are skipping past the storyline where Roland writes about the Walden communards and puts Zonk on the cover. How about revisiting that, with the memorable "Peyote and clam dip" line?

M. Dougals | Storyline | Ashland, OR | June 10, 2014
A.

An excellent idea. As it turned out, two years later the Doonesbury cast actually was on the cover of Time. The sequence about Roland's story also includes the line, "You guys are still hippies!" -- and it was only 1974. Time flies when you are having too much fun.

Q.

A few weeks ago you featured the famous strips about Mark Slackmeyer's radio show and Watergate, but I'd love it if you would also re-spin some of the other really early "Marvelous Mark" stuff, when he was just starting out. As I recall, there were a lot of dedications, including one to Bertrand Russell.

Seamus | Characters | Mystic, CT | May 30, 2014
A.

A request we are happy to honor: The future-legendary NPR star first took to the Walden airwaves on WBBY in February, 1973.

Q.

I'm enjoying the Classic Doonesbury strips, but wish they weren't going by so fast. You are skipping all kinds of good stuff -- like Zonker getting busted, for example. Could you please revisit that? I'll ask a few more times if it helps.

Darrell | Characters | Los Angeles, CA | May 16, 2014
A.

Once is enough. You've asked; you shall receive. Just click here.

Q.

I've had some technical problems getting to the site the past couple of days. Is everything okay?

Charlene | Creating the Strip | Peoria, IL | April 28, 2014
A.

All is well. As of today the site has moved, lock, stock and barrel, to The Washington Post. The glitches you experienced were no doubt a result of our behind-the-scenes preparations, but everything seems to have gone smoothly. You can read AMU's announcement about the move here, and Michael Cavna's Washington Post column here.

Q.

Speaking of re-reading older strips, I have a question: Why aren't there any 30-years-ago-today strips on the site's Flashbacks page? They've been missing and I've been missing them for quite a while now.

Margo Darling | Creating the Strip | Castlegar, CANADA | February 28, 2014
A.

A timely question and an interesting tale: The gap you refer to references the major sabbatical GBT began on January 2, 1983 in order to write Doonesbury: A Musical Comedy. When the impending leave was announced, the Wisconsin State Assembly issued a declaration pleading for "public calm in the face of this grave crisis," and former president Jimmy Carter said he was "heartbroken."

The Broadway show, a collaboration with composer Elizabeth Swados, chronicled Mike and J.J.'s engagement and the graduation of the denizens of Walden Commune from college. It opened at the Biltmore Theater on November 21, 1983. Trudeau wrote the book and lyrics, and was nominated for two Drama Desk Awards. The cast album received a Grammy nomination. A college, high school, and regional theater perennial, Doonesbury: A Musical Comedy can be ordered from Samuel French. And you can view an ad for the original show here.

The strip resumed on September 30, 1984, so 30-years-ago-today strips will once again appear on the Flashbacks page next fall.

 

Q.

Seeing Ray in last Sunday's strip made me realize I don't really remember where he first came into the Doonesbury narrative. Probably during one of B.D.'s deployments? I'd appreciate it if you would please clarify.

Dave Howard | Characters | Sacramento, CA | February 18, 2014
A.

Ray Hightower and B.D. have spent a lot of time together, much of it in uniform. They met in 1990 while serving in Operation Desert Shield, during which deployment Ray was wounded when an artillery shell exploded in front of his Humvee. At war's end, both came home to California and had their marriages blow up.

Q.

All the SayWhat? quotes would form quite a vivid chronicle of our time. Are they archived somewhere?

David Satz | Out There | Brooklyn, NY | January 22, 2014
A.

Yes! You'll find the SayWhat? Archive listed in the MEDIA CENTER dropdown menu on our home page. We added this feature during our last major rebuild, in 2010 -- the site was launched in 1995 -- so only a portion of the complete archive is available. But it's still almost 1,000 quotes. Read 'em and weep.

Q.

The storyline about B.D. and Boopsie's daughter Sam thinking about college has got me nostalgic. Can we please revisit some highlights of her childhood? Thanks.

Jerome | Characters | Anderson, CA | January 15, 2014
A.

Good idea! Let's take a walk down memory lane. Enter here.